Grammar Blog: Week 14: Could this be familiar?

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I’ve never heard of peeves as pets, so I can’t say I have a pet peeve.

On a side note: I’ve never heard of peeve used without pet accompanying it. As if it can only be a pet one takes care of rather than just being a peeve of its own. Should someone stand for peeve rights?

Anyway, I suppose if I were to answer this question as intended, I’d say my pet peeve has changed a little since the beginning of the semester. Is it not apparent yet? Well, it shouldn’t be since I haven’t said anything, but I do love typing.

No, it’s not wasting time. If it were, I’d drown in a sea of my own laziness.

It’s actually sentencing in all caps.

YOU KNOW, LIKE THIS?! HI, DOES THIS MAKE MY SENTENCE MORE AUTHORITATIVEĀ AND MEMORABLE. YOU CAN ALL TELL I’M VERY SERIOUS ABOUT WHAT I’M TYPING!

This isn’t something I’ve noticed in non-electronic formats. This seems to coincide with the birth of texting and instant messaging. I suppose it’s supposed to imply the speaker is yelling, but goddammit, that is also annoying. Is someone yelling going to make you more apt to listen to them? Hearing is not the same as listening. I’m also not going to read the large print book you want to type on your smartphone typewriter.

Trust me (Obviously, you want to now), try not to yell at anyone you’re writing to and speaking to. You may be heard, but they don’t have to listen.

QUICK, SOMEONE COMPARE THE LAST LINE TO THE 2016 ELECTION!

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